Gig Economy of India – Issues & Solutions in 2020

Project-to-project basis work is soon gaining momentum even in India, as the gig economy is entering its second phase of organised development (with market-wide acceptance and adoption). The application-based platforms offering services like cab booking, house renting, food (doorstep) delivery are estimated to employ over 2 lakh people in companies such as Ola, Zomato, Swiggy, UBER, etc. While profitability has soared for such companies, employee exploitation has also increased resultant to which the government has exhibited mindfulness towards ensuring employee welfare by developing the required legal framework.

The gig economy is here to stay in India, as is evident by the recent initiative taken by the prestigious National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru, of submitting draft guidelines for the gig economy. NLSIU is set to submit the draft guidelines to the government in February 2020, thereafter; the Karnataka government would either table a bill in the assembly or frame suitable guidelines under the purview of the incumbent laws meant to protect the rights of employees. Notably, the Karnataka state legislature’s upcoming budget session might see the draft getting tabled, reports Times of India. It has also been clarified that upon the draft being prepared by NLSIU, it might get debated in an open forum.

However, it’s a fair question to ask that has our labour market matched the pace with the incoming of the gig nature of work? Assuming a full-time gig work summons constant development of certain innate skills that are vital for gig workers, these are: entrepreneurship, networking, financials, and a knack of deciphering human psyche. While in India, at present there isn’t any regulation to standardise rates paid to gig workers. This makes mastering the art of negotiation a prerequisite to a thriving gig work career. Soaring tech usage in India has escalated those who have previously worked in the unorganised sector to be able to obtain better employment. However, even then, the jobs created in the gig economy mostly still get developed in the informal space, wherein some red flags do exist when attempting to apply this model in reality.

Essentially, new concepts like the formation of a Universal Basic Income (UBI), skill development programmes, ensuring availability of secured gig-based employment and freelance opportunities, and workplace protection, among others, is necessary to be looked upon. Hopefully the draft guidelines for the gig economy initiative underway at the NLSIU is received well by the Karnataka government and the state legislature, and upon implementation of the same, other states and governments also show active interest in inculcating the same spirit and safety in their respective regional gig workforce. The flexible work economy isn’t going anywhere, with increased adoption of technology and the availability of seamless payment avenues all that is remaining to be dealt with to make the gig economy a thriving market for the workforce is safety, security, and assurance of reasonable remuneration.

The BCG 2019 Report: The New Freelancers, states, “As per a survey of 6500 senior executives worldwide, 40% of respondents said they expected freelance workers to account for an increased share of their organization’s workforce over the coming five years.” (FlexingIT Project Trend Data: 2018-2019.

FlexingIT research also states that, “over a 3rd of companies in India estimate up to 50% reliance on flexible talent in the next 5 years.” Per a study conducted by McKinsey, estimations indicate that up to 20%-30% of the workforce in developed markets is engaged in independent work.Also, as reported by ASSOCHAM recently, the Gig Economy of India is definitely marching towards becoming a strong component of India Inc’s strategy as the sheer size of the gig economy is projected to grow at a CAGR of 17%, whereas it is likely to hit a gross volume of $455 billion by 2023.